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I have been interested in nature for most of my life but since I retired I spend as much time as I can exploring the nature reserves and wildlife hotspots of my adopted home, Dorset in southern England. Whilst out I record what I see and take snaps where I can (I am no photographer!) and that forms the basis of my Nature of Dorset website. When I find something new I like to research it and write about it in my nature notes, it is how I learn and hopefully you might find my notes helpful as well!

This website is for the people of Dorset interested in wildlife and for people from elsewhere interested in the wildlife of Dorset!

22 October, 2015

Wood Sage: not one for the pot

Although bearing the name wood sage (Teucrium scorodonia) it is not a woodland plant as one might assume. It is much more frequently found on dry, sandy and acidic soils and, in Dorset, that generally means heathland although not exclusively so. I suspect the name wood sage comes from the woody texture of its stem rather than its preferred habitat.
Wood sage is very common in the right habitat and is quite unmistakeable being a stout plant, growing to between one and two feet tall. As I say, it has a sturdy stem and pointed, pale, downy leaves. The flowers are small, pale greenish yellow trumpets that run down the stem. There is no other flower that comes to mind that is quite like it. It is a member of the germander family which are related to mints (or labiates) and bear many features of this group of plants. It is also known as wood germander.
This plant flowers from July to September but is visible virtually all year round as it is a sturdy perennial. Although sharing a name with sage

Read more: Wood Sage: not one for the pot